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A booster shot for multidisciplinary studies


Health PavilionThink four floors and 160,000 square feet of new classrooms, labs, interdisciplinary gathering areas, a new campus café, and access to new technology. Think state-of-the art health sciences equipment. Think about opportunities to work with local patients, making connections in Indianapolis’s ever-growing medical field, and gaining the type of collaborative experience you find in professional medical centers and hospitals across the country, all in one building.

Think new. And think big.

This is what you can expect from the new UIndy Health Pavilion, being built as a part of UIndy’s five-year, $50-million plan to grow facilities and improve an already incredible student experience. The pavilion will combine all health sciences departments under one roof, encouraging students to interact and collaborate as they prepare for careers in the medical field.

HP-4Dr. Anne Thomas, dean of the School of Nursing, says, “Truly, this building—the concept of this building—is to exude health and wellness.” And that means not only will health sciences students and faculty be involved, but also the pavilion will act as a beacon of health awareness for the surrounding community and UIndy as a whole.

Collaboration & hands-on learning

From day one, UIndy starts students on a path to equip them with the skills to help others. The pavilion is a great step in that journey.

Nursing student Shelby Ruiz and occupational therapy student Lauren Cain chose to come to UIndy because of the access to health care in Indianapolis and the surrounding area. Now, they see the building of the pavilion as the key connection between the University and those local health opportunities.

“This opens up a lot of opportunities for us to work more with other health professions, like we will once we’re actually out in a clinical setting,” Lauren says.

Incorporating equipment much like what graduates will see in modern hospitals, the pavilion is designed for experiential learning. “They’re talking more simulation space,” Shelby says. “That will provide us with a lot more opportunities to act like we’re working with a real live patient that has all the function of a real human being,”

New classrooms and more facilities will allow health science students to interact between disciplines, and rather than being isolated among departments, the pavilion will have the space for students to share experiences and collaborate.

“Once I get out into a hospital, I’ll be working closely with nurses,” Lauren says. “This new center will give me opportunities to learn about the other health professions and work together with them as a team.”

Pavilion only one of many projects under way

UIndy’s five-year plan—which includes the construction of the pavilion, renovations to Krannert Memorial Library, and replacing the Campus Apartments—is part of a greater “Vision 2030” project aiming to make widespread changes to the campus.

“I am really excited that social work is going to be a part of the health pavilion,” says social work major Steven Freck, “because it shows that we as a school are going to look beyond the physical health of a person and begin considering the spiritual, mental, and emotional well-being of a client.”

Lauren agrees. “We have a president who listens to what we want to see on this campus, to what the alumni want to see, to what the community wants to see, and then does something about it.”

Stephanie“It’s not just about bringing everyone together in a physical space,” says Dr. Stephanie Kelly, dean of the College of Health Sciences. “It’s about rethinking how we teach, what curriculum changes we can make, and what kind of social enrichment activities can we do. This building pulls together all the health sciences, or health-related fields, in one spot, which for a student is phenomenal because you get to learn the language of all the different professions and get to see them in action.”

And for current and future students, campus and community, the pavilion means exactly that: uniting wellness and action.