Success Stories
Lyndsy Eslinger is a senior education major currently student teaching at Reagan Elementary in the Brownsburg school district.
Beyond the Classroom

Student finds calling in teacher leadership

Classroom teaching experience is a crucial part of the elementary education program at the University of Indianapolis. But what happens outside of class can be just as impactful.

Just ask Lyndsy Eslinger ’18, an elementary education major with concentrations in reading and mild intervention education. Through hands-on student teaching placements in Indianapolis and Brownsburg, Eslinger said she came to understand the role of a classroom teacher – and all the ways she could help her students from within and outside class.

“My student teaching placements first taught me that advocating for students is a must, because not all students are the same and not all students have the same needs,” Eslinger said.

Eslinger said the elementary education program, together with her involvement in student teacher organizations, opened her eyes to the various careers she could venture into with her degree.

“Because of my leadership with the Indiana State Teachers Association and Kappa Delta Pi, I have considered becoming an educational advocate. My experience introduced me to careers in informal education – for example, a museum or zoo program director,” she explained.

  “I went from being a timid freshman in 2014 to a junior who was acting as the vice president of Indiana’s Student Program of the  National Education Association in only two short years. This shows the influence that UIndy can have on a future professional.”

Eslinger’s pursuit of leadership roles offered valuable lessons. She served as president of the Indiana Student Education Association (ISEA), vice president of Indiana’s Student Program of the National Education Association, and historian and executive board member for the University’s Sigma Omicron chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, an international honor society fostering excellence in education and fellowship among teachers.

Coming from a small town, Eslinger said she was drawn to UIndy’s favorable teacher-student ratio. She also appreciates the interpersonal and professional skills she’s developed, including the chance to present at state and national conferences and network with experts in the field.

“I’ve learned that many of the issues facing education cannot be ignored. It is my hope that my career will become a perfect marriage between educating and advocating all for public education,” Eslinger added.